MCOP 593: Academic Theory First half of class


WEEK 2, AUGUST 24: PROBLEMS & OVERVIEW Group Assignments

Clark, Tim. 2002. Problem Orientation. In The Policy Process: A practical guide for natural resource professionals. New Haven: Yale University Press

Edleman, M. 1988. Constructing the Political Spectacle. Chapter 1

Jentoft, S. and Chuenpagdee, R. 2009. Fisheries and coastal governance as a wicked problem. Marine Policy. 33: 553-560

WEEK 3, AUGUST 31: SYMBOLS AND MYTHS

Elder, C. D. and Cobb. R. W. 1983. Symbolic Attachments.  p. 28- 35

Tierney, K. et al. 2006. Metaphors Matter: Disaster myths, media frames, and their consequences in Hurricane Katrina.

Campbell, L. M. 2002. Contemporary Culture, Use and Conservation of Sea Turtles in The
Biology of Sea Turtles. Vol.2. Eds. Peter L. Lutz, John A. Musick, and Jeanette Wyneken.

Taylor, B. 2007. Surfing into Spirituality and a New, Aquatic Nature Religion. Journal of American Academy of Religion. 75(4): 923-951.

WEEK 4, SEPTEMBER 7: GOALS

Hacking, I. Why ask what? Chapter 1

Lackey, Robert T. 2001. Values, Policy and Ecosystem Health. BioScience. 51(6):437- 443.

Dörner, D. 1996. Chapter 3: Setting Goals in The Logic of Failure: Recognizing and Avoiding Error in Complex Situations.

Kentula, M. E. 2000.  Perspectives on setting success criteria for wetland restoration. Ecological Engineering. 15: 199- 209

WEEK 5, SEPTEMBER 14:  TRENDS AND CONDITIONS

Freedman, A. 2012. Climate Change ‘Footprint’ Cited in Disaster Loss Trends. Climate Central.

IPCC. 2012. Special Report: Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance 

EPA. 2014. Climate Change Indicators in the United States.  

NOAA. 2013. National Coastal Population Report: Population Trends from 1970-2020. NOAA’s State of the Coast.

Bouwer, L. 2011. Have disaster losses increased due to anthropogenic climate change? BAMS. 92(1): 39-46.

Hulme, Mike.  2009.  Endowment of Value in Why We Disagree About Climate Change: Understanding controversy, inaction and opportunity.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.  p. 109- 141.

WEEK 6, SEPTEMBER 21: EXCERCISE

NO CLASS, but your 1 pager is due as normal.  See special instructions below. 

This week you will read Dan Sarewitz's recent article, Saving Science, in The New Atlantis.   For your one pager, see if you can map Goals, Trends, Conditions, and Projections Sarewitz describes in his article.

Since we haven't taken a look at Projections yet do your best at identifying them.  In short, projections are efforts to say something about the future.


WEEK 7, SEPTEMBER 28: PROJECTIONS

Pilkey and Pilkey. 2009. Mathematical Fishing. Useless Arithmetic: Why Environmental Scientists Can’t Predict the Future.

Sarewitz, D. and Pielke, Jr., R. 1999. Prediction in science and policy. Technology in Society. 21:121- 133.

Dessai, S. and Hulme, M. 2004. Does climate adaptation policy need probabilities? Climate Policy 4.

Silver, N. 2012. A Catastrophic Failure of Prediction in The Signal and the Noise: The art and science of prediction. p.19-46.

Spiegelharter, David J. and Hauke Riesch. 2011. Don't Know, can't know: embracing deeper uncertainties when analyzing risks.  Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A. 369:4730-4750.

WEEK 8, OCTOBER 5: ALTERNATIVES 

(Class Canceled, but one pagers still due)


Perez, C. (2015). Capitalism, Technology and a Green Global Golden Age: The Role of History in Helping to Shape the Future. The Political Quarterly, 86: 191–217.

Rayner, S. and Prins, G. 2007. The Wrong Trousers: Radically Rethinking Climate Policy is a Joint Discussion Paper of the James Martin Institute for Science and Civilization, University of Oxford and the MacKinder Centre for the Study of Long-Wave Events, London School of Econ.

Mayner, A. 2015. Why We Need Risk Innovation. Nature Nanotechnology. 10: 730-731

WEEK 9, OCTOBER 12: THINKING BEINGS (& ALTERNATIVES)

Taleb, N.N. 2010.Chapter 5: Confirmation Shmonfirmation! and Chapter 6: The Narrative Fallacy. In The Black Swan. New York: Random House. p. 51- 83.

Kahneman, D. 2011. Expert Intuition: When can we trust it? and The Outside View in Thinking fast and Slow. New York: Farrar, Traus and Giroux.

Forester, J. 1984. Bounded Rationality and the Politics of Muddling Through. Public Administration Review. 44(1): 23-31

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